Monthly Archives: May 2015

What doctors can teach investors

Newspaper reporters who interview centenarians on their landmark birthday cannot seem to avoid the temptation to ask how they have lived so long. Because most people haven’t the faintest idea how they have reached 100, they tend to attribute their good health to something like a weekly tea dance.

Medical professionals will say that the most likely reason for a long life is a combination of favourable genetic and environmental factors, access to reliable medical care and a healthy dose of good luck. It follows, therefore, that anyone serious about improving their chances of a long life is better off seeking the credible advice of a doctor, not taking speculative tips from a pensioner.

But these facts rarely get in the way of a good story.

The treatments doctors use to keep us healthy are tested by a process of empirical research and clinical trials. Considering health and wealth are both high on the list of priorities for many people, it is a shame that the investment industry is typically less rigorous than the healthcare sector.

Most people turn to the investment industry to help them research their investments. This is the same as asking a pensioner how they have lived so long. The industry’s self-analysis can range from outlandish to plausible, but it will almost never be based on scientific study.

We take a different approach; one that is based on scientific rigour and hard evidence. This approach identifies the sources of investment return and we aim to deliver them to you.

This gives us confidence that we understand why your investments behave the way they do and why we are more able to design investment portfolios that suit your needs.

To find out more about our innovative investment approach, email us at hello@carpenter-rees.co.uk or call 03330 100777.

 

Worry Isn’t Something We Value

I worry about money and I bet you worry about it too.

But, here’s the interesting thing: I’ve never worked with anyone who identified “worry” as something they valued. So, why do we let worry about money drive so much of our thinking and decision making?

My experience suggests our worry comes from trying to have power over things outside of our control. For instance, we can worry about whether we’ll ever have enough money to retire. We can also worry about whether we’ll have enough money to help our kids go through university and get on to the housing ladder. All of these goals are important.

However, we’ve got to realise that even if we do everything within our power, we may still come up short. We humans have a hard time accepting this outcome. We want to believe that doing and trying will always be enough to overcome every obstacle between us and our goals. So what’s the alternative?

This leads me to a crazy idea: what if we commit to doing everything we can, then, we just let go? We let go of the worry; we let go of the fear; we let go of trying to control things we can’t control.

Yes, this idea might sound radical. And yes, telling someone to “stop worrying” is easier said than done. But I’m astounded at the number of people who’ve never considered this option.

I suggest that we treat worry as a sign that we need to revisit the things we’ve said we value most. Using these values, we can begin to work out if our worry is really worthwhile, or if we’re focused on the wrong thing.

Are we really doing everything we can, like sticking within our budget and meeting our savings goal? If so, take a step back and recognise that worry doesn’t need to play a lead role in our financial decisions.

 I understand that banishing worry isn’t easy. But there’s so little to lose, and so much to gain, if we can learn to put aside the worry and focus on what we can control when it comes to money.

Our seven hats

What is a financial adviser for? One view is that advisers have unique insights into market direction that give their clients an advantage. But of the many roles a professional adviser should play, soothsayer is not one of them.

The truth is that no-one knows what will happen next in investment markets. And if anyone really did have a working crystal ball, it is unlikely they would be plying their trade as an adviser, a broker, an analyst or a financial journalist.

Some people may still think an adviser’s role is to deliver them market-beating returns, year after year. Generally, those are the same people who believe good advice equates to making accurate forecasts.

In reality, the value a professional adviser brings is not dependent on the state of markets. Indeed, their value can be even more evident when volatility – and emotions – are running high.

The best of this new breed play many roles with their clients, beginning with the needs, risk appetites and circumstances of each individual, irrespective of what is going on in the world.

None of these roles involves making forecasts about markets or economies. Instead, the roles combine technical expertise with an understanding of how money issues intersect with clients’ complex lives.

Indeed, there are at least seven hats an adviser can wear to help clients without ever once having to look into a crystal ball:

  1. The expert: Now, more than ever, investors need advisers who can provide client-centred expertise in assessing the state of their finances and developing risk-aware strategies to help them meet their goals.
  2. The independent voice: The global financial turmoil of recent years demonstrated the value of an independent and objective voice in a world full of product pushers and salespeople.
  3. The listener: The emotions triggered by financial uncertainty are real. A good adviser will listen to clients’ fears, tease out the issues driving those feelings and provide practical long-term answers.
  4. The teacher: Getting beyond the fear-and-flight phase often is just a matter of teaching investors about risk and return, diversification, the role of asset allocation and the virtue of discipline.
  5. The architect: Once these lessons are understood, the adviser becomes an architect, building a long-term wealth management strategy that matches each person’s risk appetites and lifetime goals.
  6. The coach: Even when the strategy is in place, doubts and fears will inevitably arise. The adviser at this point becomes a coach, reinforcing first principles and keeping the client on track.
  7. The guardian: Beyond these experiences is a long-term role for the adviser as a kind of lighthouse keeper, scanning the horizon for issues that may affect the client and keeping them informed.

These are just seven valuable roles an adviser can play in understanding and responding to clients’ whole-of-life needs that are a world away from the old notions of selling product off the shelf or making forecasts.

For instance, a person may first seek out an adviser purely because of their role as an expert. But once those credentials are established, the main value of the adviser in the client’s eyes may be as an independent voice.

Knowing the adviser is independent – and not plugging product – can lead the client to trust the adviser as a listener or a sounding board, as someone to whom they can share their greatest hopes and fears.

From this point, the listener can become the teacher, the architect, the coach and, ultimately, the guardian. Just as people’s needs and circumstances change over time, so the nature of the advice service evolves.

These are all valuable roles in their own right and none is dependent on forces outside the control of the adviser or client, such as the state of the investment markets or the point of the economic cycle.

However you characterise these various roles, good financial advice is ultimately defined by the patient building of a long-term relationship, founded on the values of trust and independence and knowledge of each individual.