Planning a business exit: Eight ways to maximise value and attract buyers

As a business owner, you will have a passion for what you do but when it comes down to it, the reason most people go into business is to make money. They focus on maximising the value of the business for the point when they come to sell it. Despite this, we come across many examples where business owners fail to either maximise or extract their business’ value, because they simply don’t have the strategy to do so.

Your business may be your pride and joy but when it comes to the time that you want to exit from it, you need to be able to convince someone else of its value too.

So we thought it would be helpful to draw up this handy checklist:

  1. ‘Size does matter’ – you need to have developed your business to a level of turnover that will maximise value.
  2. Your business model needs to be reflected in the day to day business operations – is it delivering consistently, in terms of customer service; online presence; the workforce; pricing strategy; materials and suppliers?.
  3. Repeat business is crucial – do you have clients on long-term retainers, extended contracts or some type of residual income trail? We all know it’s easier to keep an existing client than to find a new one.
  4. Is your business able to generate new business leads, enquiries and sales without relying entirely on you or one key person’s skills and sales ability?
  5. Businesses that are centred around systems are simpler to run, less stressful and generally less risky. This makes them more attractive to a potential buyer and, usually, more valuable.
  6. How are your employees incentivised? How is their performance measured and rewarded? If you have a profit share-based plan or an employee share ownership plan, this substantially reduces one of the key risks for buyers – that your employees will exit when you do.
  7. Effective corporate governance and compliance can also add considerable exit value because they are seen as reducing risk.
  8. The business must be able to operate independently of your personal involvement. To put it simply, will your business survive when you’re no longer a part of it?

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